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SOMETHING TO DO WITH SELF-HATE and FAILURE PIE IN A SADNESS FACE by Brian Alan Ellis BUNDLE DEAL!

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HOT DEAL! Get both Something to Do with Self-Hate and Failure Pie in a Sadness Face by Brian Alan Ellis for only $17!

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176 pages (paperback)

Cover image: Gabino Iglesias

See, this has something to do with self-hate, and there’s something to be done with self-hate, so this is something you can do with it…

Following a summer’s worth of drug abuse, epic alcohol benders, and promiscuous sexual misadventures, you cope with your impoverished living arrangements while mourning the senility of your beloved grandmother, the destructive idiocy of your only two friends, and most importantly, the devastating loss of your free-spirited lover. There are things to consider, of course, and it’s real tough to think sometimes.

“Ellis has always had the gift of story and detail, which we would note (yet again) are stories and details so few of us know (or at least tell), but [Something to Do with Self-Hate represents] new layers… efforts to get at what the characters are feeling amidst all of this despair and decay.”

BEN TANZER, author of Be Cool

“Always a wild-ass, muffler-less ride with [Ellis]… Something to Do with Self-Hate, this exquisite wreckage, is another beauty! I’m a fan.”

MEG TUITE, author of Lined Up Like Scars

“If The Great Gatsby was about the impossibility of living the past again, Something to Do with Self-Hate is about the impossibility of going forward and the weird social netherworld is creates. Some people refuse to explore certain depth of their own personal turmoil [but] Brian Alan Ellis is not one of these people. He bares it all here.”

Dead End Follies

“This book is more soulful than I’m used to from Ellis… a little more on the touching side than the humorous. It’s still that distinctive Ellis, but it’s somehow tender… It lingers too, much more than I was expecting. The hurt is more tangible on the page, and it comes across strong through the words into the reader’s skin.”

DAVID S. ATKINSON, author of Apocalypse All the Time

“[Something to Do with Self-Hate is] both super depressing and super funny, and even though you get the feeling [Ellis is] writing about himself most of the time, [his] use of second-person narrative is really quite effective at placing you squarely in the holey, cardboard-soled shoes of his thoroughly down-and-out protagonist. Man, I thought I’d had it rough… The more Ellis I read, the more I understand why some people finally break down and sober up.”

ARTHUR GRAHAM, author of The Sugar House Papers

Something to Do with Self-Hate is a real humdinger of a bummer trip. Heartbreak, hangovers, and hopelessness abound. Everybody’s nostrils are stopped up with cheap coke… There’s no looking away from the gratuitous descriptions of sloppy sex with the crapulent and deranged, the hideous fouling of undergarments and the unending bouts of self-abuse.”

Joyless House

E-book/audio versions available at Amazon.com

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Failure Pie in a Sadness Face, a finalist in the fall 2016 Civil Coping Mechanisms Mainline manuscript contest, features twenty previously uncollected Brian Alan Ellis stories, as well as five hand-picked favorites, with a special introduction by Chelsea Laine Wells, Hypertext Review editor and Pushcart-nominated writer.

104 pages (paperback)

Cover portrait: Andy "Pants" Schwich

“Ellis is the type of person that when he sees a large woman wearing super tight leggings, he sees the glory of human expression.”

NOAH CICERO, author of Nature Documentary

“[Failure Pie in a Sadness Face] gets 4.5 stars for its effusive self-hatred alone!”

ARTHUR GRAHAM, author of The Sugar House Papers

“[Ellis] is a manic movement (bowel, or otherwise) where nothing is constipated, everything is cutting in and out of lanes of forlorn ALF nostalgia, the scars we rack up as humans and how salvageable we become knowing that Ellis is out there and writing his magic. He ignites the bullshit, rearranges the detritus of us. I am a fan and [Failure Pie in a Sadness Face is a] mesmerizing collection I read through in one sitting!”

MEG TUITE, author of Lined up Like Scars

“If pop culture is the connective tissue of a society raised on mass media, the world of Brian Alan Ellis is a forgotten subterranean kingdom that lies under a metropolitan city. It’s filled with wonders from the past and problems from the present. [His] books are becoming can’t miss literature…”

Dead End Follies

“If you are a person who is sad, [Failure Pie in a Sadness Face] is like water in the desert. It’s pretty good if you’re happy, too.”

BENJAMIN DEVOS, author of Lord of the Game

“Brian Alan Ellis never fails to entertain… it’s a quality I wish more authors had. Thank the literary gods for [Ellis]. Let’s offer up a tiny prayer to them that he continues writing books and stories for years and years to come. We need them. They’re important.”

SHELDON LEE COMPTON, author of A True Story

“Ellis returns to the gritty, or more accurately, nasty, drug-riddled, violence-prone, dilapidated-domicile-dwelling, damaged-family, death-baiting, gnarly sexual environs of his previous work. But what the Ellis completists such as ourselves are sure to be oxymoronically delighted by is the level of existential dread that has wormed its way into [his] latest work. Which is to say that [he] has always had the gift of story and detail, which we would note yet again, are stories and details so few of us know, or at least tell, but [Failure Pie in a Sadness Face shows] new layers, efforts to get at what the characters are feeling amidst all of this despair and decay.”

BEN TANZER, author of Be Cool

“In a weird way the stories [in Failure Pie in a Sadness Face] remind me of [Richard] Brautigan—the writing is displaced from reality but in a difficult to pin down manner, like it’s just outside of reality, like [it’s] a busted, spider-webbed window, brah.”

MICHAEL SEYMOUR BLAKE, author/illustrator of 12 Days of Santa Crying

“[Failure Pie in a Sadness Face is] good stuff that makes you feel good and makes you think, but not more of that thinking that hurts thinking. Which is good, because there’s too much of that already.”

DAVID S. ATKINSON, author of Apocalypse All the Time

E-book version available at Amazon.com